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Training for a Century Ride

You can train for a century ride in just 8 short weeks – here’s how!

Experienced cyclists will tell you that the most difficult part of a century ride is getting a poorly nourished and under trained body to go past its limits. Poor training can lead to an unpleasant experience and in the worst-case scenario,injuries. By following a training schedule you will be prepared to ride a century and enjoy the ride. If you're training to ride a 65 miler, multiply each number by 65%, for a 40 multiply each number by 40%; and for the 25 multiply by 25%.

Easy = leisurely ride
Pace = matching the speed you want to maintain during the century ride
Brisk = faster than your century speed

 

Week        Monday    Tuesday     Wednesday    Thursday    Friday     Saturday    Sunday    Total

Mileage     Easy*         Pace*            Brisk*            Rest            Pace         Pace           Pace      Weekly

1                6                10                 12                   0                10               30                 09         77

2               8                 12                 14                   0                12               36                10          92

3               8                 14                 17                   0                 4                42                 13        107

4               9                 15                  19                  0                 15             48                   14      120

5              11                 17                 21                  0                  17             53                  16       135

6             12                 17                 24                   0                  17              62                 18      150

7            15                  17                 25                   0                  17             65                   18      157

8            15                  17                 25                 10 (Easy)       100          Rest                Rest    167

 
Climbing Tips

 Do what works best for you, keeping these three factors in mind:

 Standing is less efficient. Your heart rate will raise to maintain a particular speed if you stand

But, standing is where you have your most explosive power.

A mix of sitting and standing enables you to "rest" some muscles while using others.


Feed Your Body

 Eat what you know. Eat something familiar 2-4 hours before the start of the ride. Don’t use ride day to try something new.

Don’t skip breakfast.

Pre-exercise high-carb meals – liquids, solids or sweets have consistently proven to enhance performance.

Load up while you ride. You will need 30-60 grams of carbs per hour while riding. Eat energy bars, carbo gels, or pocket fuels along the ride.

Prehydrate! Before a long ride, start hyper-hydrating at least 24 hours in advance.

Keep on drinking – in the summer you can lose more than 2 liters per hour – that is about 67 ounces. You need to replace it or you will start losing power within 30 minutes.

Eat wet food – fruit and vegetables are great fluid sources.

Sports drinks are best – they help replenish sodium, potassium and electrolytes.

Utilize the Rest Stops located throughout the route. At each rest stop you will find fruit, energy bars, hydration, mechanical and first aid support if necessary.